Southern Africa

That impressive Black rhino is drinking at the waterhole at night, also showing its reflection in the water. You see in this B&W fine art photograph the water reflecting with different light on the rhino’s body.

copyright Anette Mossbacher, 3 August, 2020

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This photograph was captured with a Canon EOS-1D X and a lens. The following settings were used:

  • Aperture: ƒ/4
  • Exposure time: 1/4s
  • ISO: 2000
  • Focal Length: 200mm

The original photograph has the following dimensions: 4159 by 2773 pixels (WxH).

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Background

That impressive Black rhino is drinking at the waterhole at night, also showing its reflection in the water. You see in this B&W fine art photograph the water reflecting with different light on the rhino’s body. The Black rhino is an endangered animal and belongs to the most famous African wildlife. It is rare to spot an elusive Black rhino in these days. Undoubtedly, due to poaching, these excellent animals are critically endangered, and only a few left in the wild. People pay much money for rhino horns as they believe they can use it for medicine. What a fairytale! Even though, there exists no evidence to support that at all. It is the same material as your fingernails. Unfortunately, it still does not stop poachers or its end users, which should know better in this modern world today! We humans do not need rhino horns, but the rhinos do.

The Difference Between Black and White Rhino

The way you can tell the difference between a Black and White rhino is by the shape of their mouths. A White rhino has a wider mouth. When the Dutch settlers first came to Africa, they named them “Weid mond rhino,” which means “wide-mouthed rhino.” Comparatively, the Black rhino has smaller, hook-shaped lips. That is because they are browsers, not grazers. The hook-shaped lips allow them to grab leaves and fruit off of branches. You will often find a Black rhino drinking at a waterhole alone as they are solitary. Black rhinos feed during the night and the times of dusk and dawn. The Black rhino, like the white, has very poor eyesight. To make up for it, they have an incredible sense of smell to detect danger.

The Black Rhino, Diceros bicornis, is in category critically endangered in the IUCN red list.

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